Separate “I am” from “I feel.”

Practicing using the words ‘I feel’ instead of ‘I am’ when talking about feelings can help children to feel less consumed by their emotions.

Practicing using the words ‘I feel’ instead of ‘I am’ when talking about feelings can help children to feel less consumed by their emotions.

Ruby (practitioner)

Anger iceberg

Children’s (and adult’s) anger is often triggered by an underlying emotion we cannot see. Having open conversations with your child to understand and address their underlying feelings can help you to respond effectively to them.

Children’s (and adult’s) anger is often triggered by an underlying emotion we cannot see. Having open conversations with your child to understand and address their underlying feelings can help you to respond effectively to them.

Annie (practitioner)

Remembering exam stress

Exam season can be tough on kids. Remember your own school days and the stress of exams? Use those memories to connect, empathise, and support your child through theirs.

Exam season can be tough on kids. Remember your own school days and the stress of exams? Use those memories to connect, empathise, and support your child through theirs.

Emelia (Parent)

Supporting your teen during exams

During exam season, remember to also check in with your child about their wellbeing.

During exam season, remember to also check in with your child about their wellbeing.

Emelia (Parent)

Teddy bear breathing

Tap into your child’s imagination to help them to engage with breathing exercises.

Tap into your child’s imagination to help them to engage with breathing exercises.

Annie (practitioner)

Overcoming anxiety

As parents, we may naturally want to shield our kids from distress, sometimes leading to avoiding challenging situations. Whilst this might offer short-term relief, it can sometimes limit opportunities to face and overcome their anxieties. Sometimes, supporting children to gradually face their fears can help them to develop confidence and coping skills.

As parents, we may naturally want to shield our kids from distress, sometimes leading to avoiding challenging situations. Whilst this might offer short-term relief, it can sometimes limit opportunities to face and overcome their anxieties. Sometimes, supporting children to gradually face their fears can help them to develop confidence and coping skills.

Ruby (practitioner)

Distracting from worries

Focusing on fun activities that require concentration can help your child to switch off from worries that they can’t do anything about.

Focusing on fun activities that require concentration can help your child to switch off from worries that they can’t do anything about.

Ruby (Practitioner)

Quality over quantity

Caring for a child with additional needs can sometimes make it harder for parents to spend one-to-one time with each child. However, just 10 minutes of focused one-on-one time with your child can satisfy their need for attention much more effectively than 30 minutes of divided attention.

Caring for a child with additional needs can sometimes make it harder for parents to spend one-to-one time with each child. However, just 10 minutes of focused one-on-one time with your child can satisfy their need for attention much more effectively than 30 minutes of divided attention.

Nadine (Parent + practitioner)

Getting better sleep

To celebrate World Sleep Day, we wanted to share some simple tips that can help contribute to a better night’s sleep.

To celebrate World Sleep Day, we wanted to share some simple tips that can help contribute to a better night’s sleep.

Ruby (Practitioner)

What are my child’s anxious expectations?

Identifying your child’s anxious expectations can help you to understand what they need to learn in order to overcome their anxiety.

Identifying your child’s anxious expectations can help you to understand what they need to learn in order to overcome their anxiety.

Ruby (Practitioner)